Professional Development – Truss Design: A Trick My Day Job Never Taught Me – Part 20

With almost 24 years truss design experience, I felt I had become pretty confident in my field. From designing large custom homes, to commercial jobs to multi-family, you learn a few tricks but can also fall into a rut or a way that is comfortable to us until shown something else. At that point, one can become open-minded and attempt that new approach or become closed-minded and continue on as if nothing ever happened.

Since joining Gould Design, Inc. (GDI) earlier this year, I have found a company that takes training and mentoring each team member very seriously, because your success is their success.

truss-success

I want to share a few that stand out that GDI does that a lot of jobs may or may not teach you.

Open mindedness and Teach-ability: In a number of conversations with Christopher Gould, President of Gould Design Inc., he has stated “The key to your success with GDI is twofold, 1. An open mind, 2. Teach-ability. With these two traits, the sky is the limit! We are designing components, but we are building entrepreneurs.” This speaks to me of attitude. As many of us have probably heard “Your Attitude Determines Your Altitude.” And this falls into many areas. Easy to talk about but harder to practice.

Finding out my strengths: Using the Clifton Strengths Finder test, GDI wanted to know and focus on my strengths, not my weaknesses. This was encouraging because no company that I have ever worked for had done this! They might have known about a strength I had but chose to use me in another area and left me frustrated. GDI’s goal is to build on these strengths and use them to the fullest.

clifton-strengths-finder

Mentorship: With every phase of GDI’s Professional Development program that I have been exposed to, a mentor has been assigned to me, whose main role is to shadow and assist. It may not be someone who has more experience, but it certainly will be an individual who has expertise in an area I know nothing or very little about in the day-to-day operations of the company. But it can easily turn into a two-way street, as I was working on a specific job during my PD, when I heard my mentor say, “Hey, how did you do that? I’ve never seen that before” and I was able to share some of my expertise at that moment. This mentoring program has been very valuable to me, as it has helped to build camaraderie, a thing not always encouraged in a job environment.

Learning to become more efficient: Sure, I can have a state of the art computer with a fast processor, m/b and lots of RAM, but if I don’t know how to use shortcuts in the software or other little tricks, how efficient am I? 5 key strokes suddenly become 20, multiply that by x and time adds up. At GDI, a lot of tools are available at our fingertips and sometimes it’s as simple as putting a question out on Skype and then watching as team members come forward to share their expertise and knowledge. One word – Invaluable.

Has stepping into the Professional Development program always been easy? No it has not! Yet I have learned that as long as I am willing to learn, I can still be taught a thing or two and even get better. Is that your story? Give us your feedback please. Tell us your story.

You can read Part 1 in this series here.

You can read Part 2 in this series here.

You can read Part 3 in this series here.

You can read Part 4 in this series here.

You can read Part 5 in this series here.

You can read Part 6 in this series here.

You can read Part 7 in this series here.

You can read Part 8 in this series here.

You can read Part 9 in this series here.

You can read Part 10 in this series here.

You can read Part 11 in this series here.

You can read Part 12 in this series here.

You can read Part 13 in this series here.

You can read Part 14 in this series here.

You can read Part 15 in this series here.

You can read Part 16 in this series here.

You can read Part 17 in this series here.

You can read Part 18 in this series here.

You can read Part 19 in this series here.

Stay tuned for Part 21.

Harold Isaac

Design Professional